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Getting Ready to Go!! 4 September 08

Posted by turtlemom3 in ADI, PAALS, Service Dogs, Training.
2 comments

I received several documents from PAALS yesterday. Instructions about getting ready to go and our schedule there!  I will need to “bring any poop scoopers, ADL devices, and items that dog will regularly retrieve, educational tools (ADA cards), and anything else that will regularly be used with dogs (ball throwers, etc).” OOPS! Didn’t know about the ADA cards!! Will have to print out and laminate ASAP!!) On top of everything else, I have lost my camera, and will have to borrow my oldest son’s camera to take pictures of the process! And that schedule! Talk about grueling!

Planned schedule (which will change as needed with added sessions if required – YIKES!)

Sat 9/13 and 9/14 start at 2 and end at 5pm at (training location)

Mon-Fri (15th – 19th) 9:30-4:30

*9/15 Lunch provided at (training location) by PAALS

*9/16 Dinner together at (training location) provided by PAALS from 5-6pm

* 9/18 Meet the Clients Event 5-7pm at (another location)

9/20 Sat Meet out in town – Publix (large grocery store) in downtown Columbia Time TBD

Individual sessions as needed 2-5pm (training location)

9/21 Sun Meet at (training location) at 2pm and travel to (another location) by 2:45-5pm . . . across bridge from Publix.

Mon-Fri (22nd – 26th) 9:30-4:30

*9/25 Lunch with Advisory Board member and PAALS at (another location) in Columbia

*9/27 Lunch with PAALS after ADI test

WHEW!!

We will be scrutinized at each session. I feel like I used to going to new clinical locations when I was a “basic” student nurse!

Please keep us in your prayers! We leave on Friday, 9/12, and return on Monday 9/29. We are taking a day to recover before driving back.

Looking at that schedule, you can see that even if I have wi-fi, I probably won’t have the time (or energy!) to post blogs. So look for a 2-week gap in there. In addition, I will be letting this blog lapse and have already started a NEW blog here on WordPress about Living With the Woof. I’ll probably blog one or two last posts here after returning, and give the link to the new blog site again.

I know I will need to let Woof become acclimated to us at home for about a week before introducing her to other people – a FEW at a time. I had hoped to have her with me when I go to the Greek Festival on Oct 4th with my Red Hat buddies, but this will not be possible this year. I’ll have to leave her with the Ol’ Curmudgeon and go. I’ve been looking forward to going to the annual Greek Festival at the Cathedral of the Annunciation for 2 years, and don’t want to miss it – again!

[NOTE: Waiting for the Woof ended 10/2/08. Living with the Woof picks up with the addition of Emmy to our lives! Please join us at: Living With the Woof for the ongoing saga of the Woof! Our adventures and our foibles will be chronicled there.]

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Service Dog Etiquette 12 August 08

Posted by turtlemom3 in ADA, ADI, Delta Society, Dept of Justice, Federal Law, Guidelines, IAADP, PAALS, Service Dogs.
9 comments

I recently read some  information about service dog etiquette that makes a lot of sense.

Since not everyone knows about service dogs, not everyone knows about service dog etiquette.

First – a service dog is not a pet! A service dog has at least 2 years of intensive socialization and training behind him and is an expert in what he does. Most have been bred from working dog stock and not only thoroughly enjoy, but need to work.

A person who has a service dog has a very well-trained working dog. When you meet them, remember that the dog is working. Don’t interrupt it.

Always speak to the dog’s partner first, and always ask before beginning to interact with the dog.

Don’t pet the dog or make noises at the dog without permission of the dog’s partner.

If the partner says, “No,” then the answer is, “No,” and simply agree with it and go with it. It has nothing to do with you, it has to do with the service dog and his duties.

Never offer food to a service dog! This will distract him from his job. It can even cause injury to the disabled partner.

If you encounter a service dog in training or a puppy in training, ignore it! At this stage of training, they are easily distractible and can have a whole day’s training lost if interfered with.

It is impolite to ask the partner about his disability. If you are intrusive enough to ask such an invasive question, do not be surprised if the partner refuses to discuss it. The partner is not being offensive – he just doesn’t want his privacy invaded any more than you would.

Business Owners

If you are a business person, you may not prevent a person from bringing his service dog in with him. Both Federal and State laws specify that service dogs are to be permitted into any business or location. Even clinics or hospitals.

If you don’t like dogs, or are afraid of them, simply put yourself on the other side of the person from the dog.

If the dog “forgets” his manners and barks or growls at something or someone, you may inquire as to what the problem is. If someone has been teasing, poking or otherwise alarming the dog, they should be reprimanded. On the other hand, some service dogs alert their partners to impending seizures or crashing blood sugars  by barking once or twice, and that may be the source of a bark or two.

You may ask the person to remove their service dog from the premises if the dog’s behavior is disruptive or destructive.

If another customer has a severe allergy to dogs, you might ask the person with the service dog  if you can help them outside or if they can wait outside until the person with the allergy is through. This problem has not been defined by law, however. Balancing the health needs of the allergic against the rights of the disabled with service animals will probably be worked out in courts of law in the future.

If other customers complain about the presence of the service dog, explain that the service dog is medically necessary, and that Federal law AND State law protect the rights of the person to have their service dog with them in public places.

Many disabled people with service dogs carry pamphlets or cards that explain Federal ADA laws about service dogs. Some carry information about the training their dog has gone through and any certifications it has. You might politely ask the disabled person if they have such information with them if another customer is confused and you feel you don’t have enough information yourself to help the situation.

Places To Go For More Information

Delta Society

Assistance Dogs International

International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP)

PAALS

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[NOTE: Waiting for the Woof ended 10/2/08. Living with the Woof picks up with the addition of Emmy to our lives! Please join me at: Living With the Woof for the ongoing saga of the Woof! Our adventures and our foibles will be chronicled there.]